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I have no clue about the difference between "have p.p" and "have been -ing". Could you please explain the difference in detail to me..?

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I keep telling everyone that whose fault it was and everyone keeps asking me a lot of questions regarding that.

I started telling the fact a few weeks ago. Since then, everyone keeps asking me questions.

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a) Although I`ve been telling everyone that it was his fault, I have been being asked a lot of questions as to whose fault it was.

b) Although I`ve been telling everyone that it was his fault, I have been asked a lot of questions as to whose fault it was.

c) Although I`ve told everyone that it was his fault, I have been asked a lot of questions as to whose fault it was.

d) Although I`ve been telling them that it was his fault, they have been asking me whose fault it was.

e) Although I`ve told them that it was his fault, they have asked me whose fault it was.

Out of (a)~(d) which sentence represents my intention better? Please help me...

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This is tricky. Your a) sentence has the right meaning, but "been being" sounds so awful in English we never say it and find other ways to say the same thing. In this case, to keep your full meaning, the easiest way is to drop the passive voice:

"Although I've been telling everyone it was his fault for weeks, people have been asking me whose fault it was." OR "..., people have kept asking me..."

Notice I've also moved the "for weeks" part to the first clause because in this story both things have been happening for weeks.

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Usage of Have and a P.P following it conveys an action which has happened in the past. It does not have any continuation at present.

e.g., I have told you already. I wonder how you forgot! (The message was conveyed in the past but once or may be a few times.)

But usage of Have + been + present continuous is something which happened in the past and it still continue to happen in the present.

e.g., I have been telling you since your day one, but you don't seem to follow the rule. (Started in the past and continuing in the present.)

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  • Wrong. There are many meanings of present perfect, and it ALWAYS has a connection to the present. In all the examples in the original question, present perfect (continuous or not) means something started happening in the past and continues to the present.
    – gotube
    Apr 18 '20 at 18:14

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