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We prefer present forms when we are talking about future events that have some present reality.

In the above sentence, is the use of the present progressive in the subordinate clause

"when we are talking about future events ..."

correct?

Wouldn't the following sentence be more appropriate?

We prefer present forms when we talk about future events that have some present reality.

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    Either is acceptable, and there is no real difference between them: talk is an 'activity' verb, which is so-to-speak inherently continuous/progressive. But the last couple of centuries have seen a general increase in the use of the progressive construction, even when it is not strictly necessary. – StoneyB Feb 22 '18 at 18:42
  • But I assume that even though it's a progressive form, the meaning is "general time" right? – Sinushyperbolikus Feb 22 '18 at 18:46
  • Yes, in the sense that when here represents 'whenever' rather than referring to a particular occasion. – StoneyB Feb 22 '18 at 18:52

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