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I visited a supplier, with mixed expectations to their competency. However, all of my fears were put to shame.

Does it make sense and is it good English to say that sentence? "Our fears were put to shame"

  • Well, that seams like personification – QuIcKmAtHs Feb 19 '18 at 8:34
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I visited a supplier, with mixed expectations to their competency. However, all of my fears were put to shame.

The meaning is understood; your worries that the company's performance was not up to standard were later proven false, and you felt a sense of shame or embarrassment. However, in English, the more common way to express this type of situation is to say

Luckily/however, my fears were unfounded

Oxford Dictionaries define the term

unfounded (adjective) Having no foundation or basis in fact.

  • ‘her fear that she had cancer was unfounded’
  • ‘But their fears proved unfounded because half the building is effectively below street level.’
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  • Great elaborate explanation! To add: I didn't really get a feeling of shame. It was more like a relief, combined with thankfulness. What I wanted to express with the sentence, was to give the receiver (which was the supplier) a little boosted self confidence. - So yes, unfounded sounds more approriate – nitech Feb 19 '18 at 8:48
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It's a figure of speech : Personification.

If you're referring to the usage of the phrase -put to shame

It's normal in English language to use personification for emphasis as per the situation.

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