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I heard this phrase in a TV show. Two characters are drinking in the scene, and one of them is not pleased with the low quality of the alcohol brought by the other person. The conversation goes like this:

A: Where did you get this swill, man?

B: It's a celebratory gesture. We open, we sip, we move on with our lives. Everything does not have to be top-shelf foodie porn.

A: Yeah, but you didn't have to roll a hobo to get it.

What does "roll a hobo" mean here? I found that "hobo" means "homeless, poor person", so I guess the sentence means something like "you don't have to act like you're that poor". I'm still not completely sure though, because "roll" has too many different meanings, and I could not find any reference to the phrase "roll a hobo" online. Does anyone know what the correct interpretation is?

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, tchrist Feb 18 '18 at 12:13

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  • Hello, voyididodi. This is general reference: The Online Slang Dictionary. Please include the research you’ve done. Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic. – Edwin Ashworth Feb 18 '18 at 10:55
  • From Google Dict - 6. informal - rob (someone, typically when they are intoxicated or asleep). synonym: mug "if you don't get drunk, you don't get rolled" – squidlydeux Feb 18 '18 at 16:13
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To "roll" someone is slang for to rob someone.

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Based on the context of the dialogue, it seems that second person is taking jibe at first person for bringing the low quality drink. He suspects that he has taken or stole it from a homeless person sleeping on the road.

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