0

Here is the original sentence:

In early 1992, Wayne Calloway, PepsiCo’s chairman and CEO, along with the presidents of each of the company’s restaurants, and Ken Stevens, the senior vice president of strategic planning, was (they WERE evaluating?) evaluating two opportunities..

I think this is wrong because there is an "and" after the "along with" prepositional phrase.

So, if we break down the sentence:

In early 1992, {Wayne Calloway, PepsiCo’s chairman and CEO}, {along with the presidents of each of the company’s restaurants}, {and Ken Stevens, the senior vice president of strategic planning}, was evaluating two opportunities...

The "and" seems to leave us with the noun structure of: “Wayne Calloway, PepsiCo’s chairman and CEO and Ken Stevens, the senior vice president of strategic planning were evaluating two opportunities...?

Thoughts?

  • How many presidents did each of their restaurants have? – Will Crawford Feb 25 '18 at 2:22
  • Interesting question...more than 3 for sure. – LyLa_Austin Feb 26 '18 at 5:10
0

You're looking at that "and" from one perspective, partly because the original sentence was so loosely written.

Rather than interpreting the “and” as separating Wayne and the presidents from Ken, why not just as easily join the presidents with Ken, opposing the combination to Wayne?

| improve this answer | |
  • So true. I feel like the sentence is confusing to say the least. Is this one of those "gray" areas where were and was are both correct? – LyLa_Austin Feb 16 '18 at 2:03
  • I see what you mean; I often struggle with "were" and "was" and I don't think this area is nearly so grey – Robbie Goodwin Feb 16 '18 at 23:08
0

In early 1992 Wayne Calloway, PepsiCo’s chairman and CEO, along with the presidents of each of the company’s restaurants and Ken Stevens, the senior vice president of strategic planning, were evaluating two opportunities.

  • In early 1992 Wayne Calloway, PepsiCo's chairman and CEO,
  • along with the presidents of each of the company's restaurants and Ken Stevens, the senior vice president of strategic planning,
  • were evaluating two opportunities.

All that was needed was two drop the first and fourth commas, and use were instead of was (for a compound subject).

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.