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All the English verbs that I can think of, take the same form in the infinitive and in the imperative. For example "to jump" and "Jump."

Is there any English verb for which the infinitive and imperative forms are different?

  • In English, imperatives have both an active and passive voice form. I take you ask about active voice, correct? – J. Taylor Feb 11 '18 at 16:45
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    Yes. The imperative construction is formed from the infinitive verb form in all cases. Except for the auxiliary be, the infinitive verb form is the same as the present tense form in all but the third person singular; be is the only English verb with a special infinitive form. – John Lawler Feb 11 '18 at 17:32
  • @JohnLawler Except for second person singular - "thou goest" etc? – WS2 Feb 11 '18 at 18:14
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    An imperative clause uses the plain form of the verb, sometimes called the infinitive. There are no exceptions. – BillJ Feb 11 '18 at 18:49
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We always use the infinitive without to to form the imperative.

However, the structure of the imperative sentence in the passive voice is different from the one in the active voice. Changing the voice, we change the form of the verb.

Compare:

Active voice: Do it now.

Passive voice: Let it be done now.

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In a comment, John Lawler wrote:

Yes. The imperative construction is formed from the infinitive verb form in all cases. Except for the auxiliary be, the infinitive verb form is the same as the present tense form in all but the third person singular; be is the only English verb with a special infinitive form.

  • What about the second person singular? – WS2 Feb 12 '18 at 18:15
  • @WS2 See english.stackexchange.com/a/178585/2085 – tchrist Feb 12 '18 at 18:31
  • I think we are at cross purposes. What I was referring to was JL's comment that "the infinitive verb form is the same as the present tense in all but the third person singular". I'm just noting that the infinitive differs also from the second person singular - if thou gettest my meaning. – WS2 Feb 12 '18 at 19:15
  • I am confused. How does the infinitive and imperative form of "be" actually differ ? Please provide examples. – loxaxs Oct 1 '18 at 16:02

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