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Are the following definitions correct ?

  1. Attention line is the part of the recipient address in a letter or on an envelope which names the person to whom the letter should be handed to.

  2. Subject line is the part in a letter which refers to a particular subject, like a recent call and its date and something that has been discussed, like an order ect. The subject line can include a reference number of a process like an order or a project number.

I'm asking you to confirm the definition and its common use in English letters, especially in business.

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  • These definitions represent my compact view after studying business English Level 1 and actually Level 2 in accordance to the availablle study-material. But, its my own definition to keep clear, which part in a business letter is having which function. e.g. For managing, archiving, or especially for judging.
    – FrankMK
    Feb 5 '18 at 15:28
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Attention line is the part of the recipient address in a letter or on an envelope which names the person to whom the letter should be handed to.

Subject line is the part in a letter which refers to a particular subject, like a recent call and its date and something that has been discussed, like an order ect. The subject line can include a reference number of a process like an order or a project number.

The definition is accurate. I use "Subject Line" frequently, this is used in both a letter and the subject line of an email. I haven't used "Attention Line" literally, but have referred to the recipient as "for the attention of".

So in answer to your question, yes the definition is accurate, but the syntax would not be used explicitly. Instead it would be obvious by the placement, for example:

MR X

ADDRESS

To Mr X

RE: Subject to discuss

Text of letter.


So the letter itself would never refer to an "attention line", it would be obvious because it is addressed to the recipient. The letter would never refer to "subject line", if anything, it would have RE (regarding).

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