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How can you predict which verbs take which type of infinitive as their complements? For example, is the to before open here mandatory, forbidden, or optional?

  • The Gold Monetization Scheme will be revamped to enable people open a hassle-free gold deposit account.
  • The Gold Monetization Scheme will be revamped to enable people to open a hassle-free gold deposit account.

In other words, does the verb enable:

  1. take only a bare-infinitive complement the way let does?
  2. take only a to-infinitive complement the way allow does?
  3. take an optional to before its infinitive complement the way help does?

How can you tell which verb does which thing?

  • Enablerequires to. I suspect it's the kind of thing you just have to learn one word at a time (assist, for example, would probably take something like with opening rather than any infinitive), but I'm curious to see if other folks know of a rule I've never noticed. – 1006a Feb 2 '18 at 13:48
  • Answered at Why does "want" catenate with a nominal plus to-infinitive whereas "insist" does not?. There are lists showing various catenation patterns and the verbs displaying them at the linked Wiktionary article. // I have a list of 318 catenating verbs; 'enable' ticks only the {complex} + {to-infinitive} box. This enabled the early pioneers to survive. – Edwin Ashworth Feb 2 '18 at 16:11