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'today is night without the darkness' and "the fish and chip lady sings 'love me tender' over the splutter of fat', what do the two lines mean? Really can't understand it. Thank you for your help.

'today is night without the darkness' and "the fish and chip lady sings 'love me tender' over the splutter of fat', what do the two lines mean? Really can't understand it. Thank you for your help.

closed as primarily opinion-based by curiousdannii, David, Mari-Lou A, Skooba, FumbleFingers Jan 31 '18 at 13:54

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • You might try Literature.SE. Contextual interpretation is typically well received there. – Skooba Jan 31 '18 at 13:14
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A tropical beach is virtually deserted at night and when it's raining. Thus the poet can compare a beach scene with no people about and where there is a light rain with grey clouds moving across the sky to a "night without darkness." The literary device employed is oxymoron: the chief quality of night, i.e., that it's dark, is negated, forcing the reader to resolve the paradox by thinking of other qualities, such as quietness and lack of human activity.

Your second question deals with two cultural allusions: 1) to the humble British dish of batter-fried fish and fried potato wedges, the onomatopoeia"splutter" referencing the sound made when food containing any moisture is dropped into hot fat, and 2) to the 1956 hit song by Elvis Presley "Love Me Tender."

  • Thank you very much KarlG! Now I totally understand the first question but still stuck on the second question. I know 'fish and chip' is food and 'love me tender' is a song, but what does it mean 'the fish and chip lady' and 'over the splutter of fat'? Does it mean when the lady sing the song it seems like cooking fish and chip? but it doesn't make sense :( Can you help me out again? – hzzy Feb 1 '18 at 2:14
  • No, the woman sings the song as she's frying up the fish and chips. – KarlG Feb 1 '18 at 2:17
  • 'the woman sings the song as she's frying up the fish and chips' Does the poet want to imply the woman's voice is magnetic and beautiful, like the sound "splutter" when frying up the fish and chips? sorry i am not a native English speaker. Thank you for your explanation! – hzzy Feb 1 '18 at 2:28
  • Splutter is neither magnetic nor beautiful. The whole poem consists of a series of quite everyday impressions culminating in the bluest, coldest sea, the superlatives suggesting a transcendence the other images do not have. The woman singing as she fries food is just one impression. It has no greater significance than what it is. – KarlG Feb 1 '18 at 2:57
  • I've got it. It is just one of the everyday impressions. Thanks KarlG!!! – hzzy Feb 1 '18 at 3:30

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