1

Consider the sentence

The sun shines such that it is warm and water evaporates.

The two parts of the sentence "it is warm" and "water evaporates" are independent sentences and a comma should be placed between them.

The sun shines such that it is warm, and water evaporates.

But this reads like

The sun shines such that it is warm. Water evaporates.

I would like to convey that both "it is warm" and "water evaporates" are a consequence of the sun shining without ending up with an extremely long sentence. What's the best way to rephrase this?

  • 1
    Several different things in there, Till Hoffmann, starting with there is very little chance of anyone ever using "the sun shines such that it is…" and sounding natural. If you must go that way then why not try "so that…"? Further, could you look again at the wording of 'The two parts of the sentence "it is warm" and "water evaporates" are independent sentences and a comma should be placed between them', please? – Robbie Goodwin Feb 12 '18 at 0:08
  • @Till Commas aren't always used between short independent clauses. But it would be clearer if recast as something like "The sun shines such that it warms the earth and evaporates the groundwater." – Zan700 Aug 30 '18 at 13:10
1

There is no reason to use a comma inside the complex clause (two clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction), "it is warm and water evaporates". Still no reason when that is preceded by "such that" which creates a single dependent clause.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.