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Although there are many questions regarding the use of "range from * to *", I could not find the perfectly-fitting inquiry from the search, so I'm asking this question.

Is the following legitimate and grammatically correct?

In business areas ranging from A to B to C, the trend is accelerating.

Note: The reason I didn't put comma is because none of the examples in dictionaries use one between "range from * to *".

Let me know if any use of comma or 'and' is more desirable, such as:

In business areas ranging from A, to B, to C, the trend is accelerating.

In business areas ranging from A, to B, and to C, the trend is accelerating.

I would use other construct if there is more suitable one, but using "range from * to *" seems to capture the nuance best.

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This is a very general explanation. You do not normally place commas before prepositions, e.g. 'to', because they are completing an idea you've already started. You often do need commas and/or conjunctions when adding on new ideas.
So, your example sentence is correct with no commas but they would be needed for something like:

In business areas extending to A, B, and C, the trend is accelerating.

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