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The company's first products were minimized to hats and scarfs only, but soon after other accessories were added to the range of products.

Is that sentence correct? I think it should rather be:

At first the company's assortment was limited to scarfs and hats, but other accessories were added to its range soon after.

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    You are right. 'Minimized' has the sense of 'deliberately made as small as possible', which is not appropriate in this context. Jan 22, 2018 at 9:22
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    I doubt that minimise + to + NP is grammatical. Jan 22, 2018 at 9:23
  • They do not mean the same. Both minimized and limited are perfect right and have their uses. Think again.
    – Kris
    Jan 22, 2018 at 10:43
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    @EdwinAshworth What could be wrong with minimise + to + NP? books.google.com/ngrams/…
    – Kris
    Jan 22, 2018 at 10:45
  • @Kris There are modern examples such as 'minimised to the taskbar' using a quasi-directional to-phrase, but I haven't found any examples using OP's 'limited / restricted / confined' [to a less-than-the-maximum-possible range etc] sense. Have you? I can't get to the examples from Ngrams nowadays. Jan 22, 2018 at 16:48

1 Answer 1

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Limited or confined.

The company's first products were limited to hats and scarfs only, but soon after other accessories were added to the range of products.

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  • Why not minimized?
    – Kris
    Jan 22, 2018 at 10:43
  • Hi @Kris, as explained above by Kate B. Also note, noun phrase or nominal phrase (abbreviated NP) is a phrase which has a noun (or indefinite pronoun) as its head, or which performs the same grammatical function as such a phrase, ref en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noun_phrase
    – MikeRoger
    Jan 22, 2018 at 10:49
  • What about that?
    – Kris
    Jan 22, 2018 at 10:52

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