1

I want to use the next sentence.

The policy is not to do A too frequently, and not to do B too frequently.

For making the sentence concise, I tried to make one sentence.

The policy is neither to do A too frequently nor to do B too frequently.

The policy is neither to do A nor to do B too frequently.

The policy is neither to do A too frequently nor to do B.

Which is correct?

closed as off-topic by tchrist Jan 17 '18 at 7:42

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified." – tchrist
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • The first rewrite means the same (and is as long) as the original sentence; the second is ambiguous; the third means something else. All are written in correct English. Are we wordsmithing something you're writing? – David K Jan 17 '18 at 4:57
  • @DavidK I do not understand your last sentence. wordsmithing? That sentence will be written in an academic paper. – Danny_Kim Jan 17 '18 at 5:00
  • yourdictionary.com/wordsmithing. By the way, I like the original sentence. I could shave five words off it with a slight loss of rhythm and clarity; but if you're up against a page count I'd look elsewhere for rewrites first, and if you're not up against a page count, I would leave it as is. – David K Jan 17 '18 at 5:05
  • I like the first sentence. You could also shake off the tail and loose the repetition by writing: "The policy is neither to do A too frequently nor to do B all that often at all". – Jesse Ivy Jan 17 '18 at 5:07
  • I will remain the sentence without change. thank you – Danny_Kim Jan 17 '18 at 5:18

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