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Temperamentalness not being a word in the English language as such, what quality might you say someone who is temperamental possesses? Temperamentality has a bit of a "made up" ring to it too.

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  • Google Books claims 283 written instances of temperamentalness, but that must be set against 1140 instances of temperamentality (and neither are listed in the full subscription-only OED). They do list trivialness and irritableness though (defined as a rare alternatives to triviality, irritability). But I wouldn't use "in a dictionary" as the final word on whether something's a word or not. Imho they're both regularly-formed, hence "acceptable". Jan 15, 2018 at 16:38
  • Excitability, capriciousness, irritability, irascibility, touchiness, moodiness, oversensitivity,...
    – Dan Bron
    Jan 15, 2018 at 16:38
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    Please include the research you’ve done. Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic. Here, looking up synonyms for 'temperamental' is an obvious starting place. Jan 15, 2018 at 17:14

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A close synonym for tempramental is volatile. Volatility includes the definition:

  1. changeable; mercurial; flighty: a volatile disposition.
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I think you could get by with moody:

moody
adj
1. Given to frequent changes of mood; temperamental.
2. Subject to periods of depression; sulky.
3. Expressive of a mood, especially a sullen or gloomy mood: a moody silence.

Noun form: moodiness. [Thanks @DanBron!]

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    He wants a noun. So moodiness.
    – Dan Bron
    Jan 15, 2018 at 16:38
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    I normally understand temperamental to mean prone to erratic or unpredictable changes (in mood or performance, which is why you might say a piece of electronic equipment is temperamental if it doesn't always work as expected). To me, moody/moodiness always implies sullenness/gloom, whereas temperamental can apply to both aspects of, say, manic depression (or more precisely, to the tendency to switch unpredictably between the two modes/moods). Jan 15, 2018 at 16:54
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volatility, instability, inconstancy, variability, inconsistency, unpredictability, capriciousness, eccentricity, changeableness, moodiness

Source: Google dictionary, and Merriam Webster online dictionary

(According to this Google blog post which was repeated by searchenginewatch, the Oxford Pocket English Dictionary is used, and the statistics on word usage come from their N-gram tool, which is now publicly available.)

https://webapps.stackexchange.com/questions/60249/where-does-google-get-its-dictionary-data

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