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I'm trying to phrase a sentence with two prepositional phrases that use that same object. Specifically:

"This is due, in part, to my training of and good rapport with the team."

How should I punctuate this? Possibilities I've tried so far:

"This is due, in part, to my training of – and good rapport with – the team."

"This is due, in part, to my training of, and good rapport with, the team."

"This is due, in part, to my training of – and good rapport with –, the team." (This looks particularly wrong).

What is the grammatical rule to apply here?

  • There is no grammatical rule, because grammatical rules cover syntax and morphology, not punctuation. – tchrist Jan 15 '18 at 15:41
  • Punctuation serves to give an indication of the grammatical structure and/or meaning of the text, so I'd say that it has a place in grammar. – BillJ Jan 15 '18 at 16:37
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    << and good rapport with >>, as a parenthetical, can be set off in the usual ways – using commas, dashes or brackets. I'd avoid the commas as there are two already, and never use the 'semicolon = super-comma' trick in this sort of case. And I wouldn't go with the zero-punctuation option here either. / I'd probably use << "This is due in part to my training of, and good rapport with, the team." >>. The other options seem too heavy-duty. – Edwin Ashworth Jan 15 '18 at 17:36
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I've seen the first way in academic writing. By the first way, I mean: "This is due, in part, to my training of and good rapport with the team."

  • Welcome to EL&U! For reinforcing your answer, sources are appreciated. – A Lambent Eye Dec 20 '18 at 17:43

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