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Both normal cells and not normal cells can be found in the body of a diseased human being. What adjectives are used in medicine and biology for characterization of such cells? healthy/normal/intact/... cells ? diseased/sick/affected/... cells ?

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  • The question by Diusha has been edited by @Centaurus in a way that deeply changes its meaning. Diusha may want to edit it (back). Jan 14 '18 at 11:34
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    @NicolasBarbulesco. All I did was to correct grammar and spelling. Anyone can check what I've done. I've been here long enough and know better than that.
    – Centaurus
    Jan 14 '18 at 12:22
  • @Centaurus — You should look (better). You have transformed twice "deceased" into "diseased". Death and disease are not exactly the same thing. :-) You removed "sure". "Sore"? Jan 14 '18 at 13:57
  • I meant “diseased”, not “deceased” :-) Centaurus, thank you for this correction. If I wrote "sure", then I was wrong; I meant “sore”. Thank you, Nicolas Barbulesco.
    – Diusha
    Jan 14 '18 at 15:09
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Healthy cells are also be referred to as normal cells. The opposite would be "abnormal cells", a generic term. Specific terms abound as do the types of abnormalities you can find: malign, necrotic, hypertrophic, tumoral, dysplastic, etc.

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  • Thank you, Centaurus. Is using of this terms correct in following sentences? 1. The molecules of the drug can get into both abnormal and healthy patient’s cells. 2. The molecules of the drug can get into both abnormal and normal patient’s cells.
    – Diusha
    Jan 14 '18 at 11:32
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    @Diusha I wouldn't use molecules. That's sort of obvious. "The drug will get into both healthy and abnormal cells."
    – Centaurus
    Jan 14 '18 at 12:24
  • I thought additionally and I seem “abnormal” can be misleading in this context. “Abnormal” can mean the difference from the norm which is not caused by disease. We can say “abnormal” about healthy cell which is too smal, too big or has unusual shape. Correct me please if I wrong.
    – Diusha
    Jan 14 '18 at 15:09
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    @Diusha - I agree that "abnormal" can be misleading. It is better to be precise. So, we may say "affected cells", "diseased cells" or "sick cells" if this is clear in the context. We may precise the defect: "falciform cells" or whatever. Jan 14 '18 at 22:43
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    @Diusha Use the generic term: "abnormal cells". That's what we use in medicine. Other words such as "anomalous", "atypical", "unhealthy" or "bizarre" can only be used in specific contexts.
    – Centaurus
    Jan 15 '18 at 14:11

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