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I have an exercise in which I have to correct mistakes in the sentences. One of them is : "Tom borrowed me a very interesting book last week." Is there any problem with "a very"? Because I have no idea what is wrong with this sentence. The "a very interesting" part is the only idea I have.

closed as off-topic by John Lawler, Centaurus, MetaEd Jan 12 '18 at 23:27

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    It's *borrowed me that's wrong. – John Lawler Jan 12 '18 at 22:30
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    "Tom lent me" or "I borrowed from Tom" – Centaurus Jan 12 '18 at 22:32
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There isn't a problem with "a very interesting," but did you look at "borrowed me?" It looks like there might be a problem there. I don't think I can borrow me something.

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    depends on the dialect, “I’ma gonna borrow me a book from that nice lady down to the library” is accepted in some parts. :-) But you’re right, that’s what they were looking for here. – Jim Jan 12 '18 at 22:39
  • To me, your sentence would be "I'm going to borrow myself a book from that nice lady working in the library." @Jim – TheJavaNub Jan 12 '18 at 22:43
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    I am sure that this use is uncommon. Equally I am sure it was what the author of the question had in mind. It is a perfect example of a question which is more about trying to guess what the questioner is thinking than about correct grammar. Though unusual, there are plenty of examples of the equivalent: ‘give me that book’; ‘tell me a story’; shoot me a brace of pheasant; ... It is easy to think of a context for it. One student says to another: “Please could you borrow me the latest copy of ‘math quarterly’? I lost my library card.”. It’s non-standard, but not exactly wrong. – Tuffy Jan 12 '18 at 22:48
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    But you’re missing the point.  There’s nothing wrong with the (noun) (verb) (noun) structure; e.g., “Tom read a book.”  The (noun) (verb) (noun) (noun) structure works for verbs that accept an indirect object; e.g., “Tom told Mary a story.”  The problem is that “borrow” doesn’t normally accept an indirect object, and is being misused in the sentence.  “Borrow” means “to take something from someone with the intention of giving it back after using it” (Refs: Cambridge,  … (Cont’d) – Scott Jan 13 '18 at 1:48
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    (Cont’d) …  Merriam-Webster, Oxford), and it is being used incorrectly. (Or at least, if it’s not wrong, it’s highly non-standard.) The sentence should probably be “Tom lent me a very interesting book last week.” (“lent” is the past tense of “lend”.)  Alternatively, depending on what is actually meant, “Tom borrowed a very interesting book from me …” or “I borrowed a very interesting book from Tom …”  (M-W does give “lend” as a non-standard meaning of “borrow”.) – Scott Jan 13 '18 at 1:48

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