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"it was ... interesting to see these (1) quite deprived areas (1) erm (.)"

Is quite here being used as an quantifier and is the noun "areas" countable in this context? It sounds to me like 'quite' is also used as a filler but I'm not sure. For example, when girls colloquially add unecessary "like" and "really" in their phatic talk.

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  • The ellipses represent the pause in speech, correct? Is this something you heard or read? The numbers in brackets is your way to highlight or emphasise the word quite, correct?
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Jan 12, 2018 at 8:57
  • Could you please use one * on either side of the word for italics, or two ** to embolden a word. Thanks :)
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Jan 12, 2018 at 9:01
  • @Mari-Lou The ellipsis represents omission of a word (contraction/elision). The number in brackets represents the seconds of the pause (3) and the (.) is a micropause. I can't add any italics or bold because I posted this on my phone.
    – aesking
    Commented Jan 12, 2018 at 9:10
  • Also this is a quote from a format of a spoken transcript. I didn't just write it down.
    – aesking
    Commented Jan 12, 2018 at 9:15
  • So this quote is from a recorded piece of audio. Could you include its link, please? Please cite your source. P.S. You should say in your question what those marks mean, I had no idea until you explained. Phones do have asterisks, you can use them for italics and bold, or you can use the editing tools that is positioned above the question box when you reopen it. Click the link: english.stackexchange.com/posts/426043/edit PPS it is customary to enclose ellipsis in square brackets [...] to show it is not a pause in speech
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Jan 12, 2018 at 9:22

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