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How to name a period of time, that you want to meet a person you work / study with at, which is not during the studies or work?

Do you want to have a lunch (off-work?)?

I can help you with that (off-work?).

I usually study in my (off-work?) time.

Is that a comprehensible phrase? Or there are better alternatives?

  • Do you want to have a private lunch (with me)? – alwayslearning Jan 11 '18 at 13:23
  • @alwayslearning doesn't it give the romantic connotation? – Eduard Jan 11 '18 at 16:06
  • If someone wants a working lunch, they will call it a 'working lunch'. Just inviting to 'lunch' implies it is not work-related. – Nigel J Jan 11 '18 at 16:27
  • @NigelJ the solution should be more general. "I can help you with that off-work", for example. – Eduard Jan 11 '18 at 16:31
  • @Eduard When I am eating lunch, or doing personal study, or socialising I am (self-evidently) not working. I cannot see the point of your distinction. – Nigel J Jan 11 '18 at 16:34
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We generally use free in a variety of forms to cover your examples:

Are you free for lunch?

I can help you with that when I'm free.

I usually study in my free time.

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You could ask, "can I help you with that outside of work hours?"

You could also say:

  • I usually study in my free time.
  • Can I help you with that in my spare time?
  • Can I help you with that outside of work?
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I would normally phrase this as:

Would you like to have lunch on your next day off?

I can help you with that on my [next] day off?

I usually study in my spare time.

Non-working time can be called a number of things: "Day off" or "spare time" are probably the most common in the UK.

  • Spare time: Time when you are not working or do not have anything you must do.

  • Day off: A day when you are not required to work

  • Off day: A day when you do not perform as well as usual.

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You can use the words 'before' or 'after' to convey your thought, if you're not certain of the time.

Example - "Do you want to have lunch after work/studies?"

Or you can use the exact time for asking. Like

"Do you want to have lunch at 2 O'clock?"

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