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I have been admitted to the upcoming class and been planning to live in the dormitory.

I have been admitted to the upcoming class and have been planning to live in the dormitory.

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    I marginally prefer the second phrase as the first "have been" is a passive form while the second is not – Henry Jan 10 '18 at 10:17
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Your question concerns ellipsis, omitting one or more words obviously understood but needed to parse the grammar. For this to occur, you need two strictly parallel elements joined by a coordinating conjunction, including than.

You are asking how much you can omit in the sentence

I have been admitted to the upcoming class and I have been planning to live in the dormitory.

Omitting the I in the second clause isn't really ellipsis. All you're doing is using a compound verb with a single subject.

Whether you can omit have and/or been from the second verb phrase depends on whether have been admitted and have been planning are in strict parallel. But they are not: the first is present perfect passive voice and the second is present perfect progressive, active voice.

That leaves you:

I have been admitted to the upcoming class and have been planning to live in the dormitory.

I suppose you have your reasons for not writing

I have been admitted to the upcoming class and plan/am planning to live in the dormitory.

This would be the most idiomatic way of saying what you want to say.

  • There´s something weird cause the examples are not taking into account the parallelism in the clauses and the not parallelism is an error. Like "I have been admitted to the upcoming class and plan/am planning to live in the dormitory." should be "I have been admitted to the upcoming class and have planned to live in the dormitory.". Lot´s of examples here. owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/623/01 – Billeeb Jan 11 '18 at 11:14
  • That's rubbish. I have just been admitted to the class but haven't yet arranged housing, but I plan/am planning to live in the dorm. Your first sentence is gibberish. – KarlG Jan 11 '18 at 11:23
  • I'm referring to the two last examples you gave. While I agree with the first part of the answer I don't agree with the non-ellipsis and I see the parallelism in the one you just wrote, but not the last one in your example. I realise I wrote "examples", and failed to be specific about that last one. – Billeeb Jan 11 '18 at 11:47
  • What don't you understand? Strict parallelism necessary for ellipsis? Or that "I have been admitted and plan/am planning" is grammatical? Nothing forces me to us present prefect in the second element of a compound verb if that tense is not necessary. – KarlG Jan 11 '18 at 12:50
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It's called Ellipsis and is usually not normally possible after other conjunctions besides and, but and or.

You can omit the subject in the second part of a phrase in which the conjunction (and) is connecting two ideas for the sake of avoiding redundancy:

I have been doing this and I have been doing that.

But you you are not allowed to remove the verb or a part of the verbal form, unless you remove it completely, cause the whole verbal form and subject is repeated:

I have been doing this and that.
I have been doing this and have been doing that.

If you left the part of the verbal form out, then the verbal form loses its meaning and you cannot guess the tacit subject:

Have been buying. (I-They-We-You)
Has been buying. (She-He-It)
Been buying. (Have? Has? Had?)

Types of conjunctions:

Subordinating conjunctions: Also known as subordinators, these conjunctions join dependent clauses to independent clauses.

Coordinating conjunction: Also known as coordinators, these conjunctions coordinate or join two or more sentences, main clauses, words, or other parts of speech which are of the same syntactic importance.

Correlative conjunction: These conjunctions correlate, working in pairs to join phrases or words that carry equal importance within a sentence.

Conjunctive adverbs: While some instructors do not teach conjunctive adverbs alongside conjunctions, these important parts of speech are worth a mention here. These adverbs always connect one clause to another, and are used to show sequence, contrast, cause and effect, and other relationships.

  • I agree that there's something wrong with the original proposal, but I think you've missed spelling out which portions of the verb phrase can and cannot be deleted under conjunction reduction for compound predicates. Notice how “I have been laughing at failure and crying at success” is perfectly grammatical. – tchrist Jan 10 '18 at 11:27
  • I'll make the clarification about what a conjunction can connect. – Billeeb Jan 10 '18 at 14:31
  • I disagree. The question was related to ellipsis: "the omission from speech or writing of a word or words that are superfluous or able to be understood from contextual clues." My explanation was related to that. Your question is about conjunction and what they can/can't connect. That was never in the scope of my answer. If I did not took it into account was because of that. – Billeeb Jan 11 '18 at 11:33
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In the examples you gave the sentences are awkward. A better structure would be the following: I have been admitted to the upcoming class and I planned on living in the dormitory. The verb Admitted is past tense so you can't use planning in the same sentence. This is an error.

  • The verb admitted in the sentence is not tensed at all; it's a past participle. And there is no rule that forbids using planning in the same sentence with any other verb tense. I really wonder where people come up with these zany ideas. – John Lawler Jan 10 '18 at 20:35
  • There´s something weird cause the examples are not taking into account the parallelism in the clauses and the not parallelism is an error. Like "I am eating and won´t go" should be "I am eating and am not going". Lot´s of examples here. owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/623/01 – Billeeb Jan 11 '18 at 11:10

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