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I'm wondering how to describe in one word (a noun) the act of transferring money from a lottery operator to the digital wallet of a player who won a prize.

It's supposed to be the name of a wallet operation (along with deposit, withdrawal and payment) shown to the player in the mobile application.

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    I don't understand. Isn't it a "deposit"? – terdon Jan 9 '18 at 9:41
  • @terdon In our nomenclature a deposit is a transfer of money from a player to their own wallet. We need a different word to distinguish these two operations. – user275415 Jan 9 '18 at 9:53
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As you are specifically referring to prizes you could use the word payout. It sounds informal but is widely used and only refers to a payment from an organisation to an individual.

If all payouts are made using the digital wallet then 'payout' on its own would be sufficient, otherwise a term such as 'digital payout' or 'wallet payout' would distinguish such transactions from 'cheque payouts', 'PayPal payouts' or other types of payout transaction.

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I would go with award.

An amount of money given as an official payment, compensation, or grant. ‘a 1.5 per cent pay award’

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1. Disbursement

disbursement (dĭs-bûrsˈmənt)►

n.
The act or process of disbursing.
n.
Money paid out; expenditure.
  1. Winnings

3.Payout

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Cash-in: As in "cash in" one's chips for legal tender at a casino, for example.

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I'm assuming that you want a word for the operation performed by the payer on a wallet owned and controlled by the receiver. Regardless of the technology involved, the word choice is inherently difficult, since the payer does not actually control the wallet, e.g. they can't withdraw a payment once made. Your term should reflect this lesser capability and the one-way nature of the transaction. Some possibilities include:

  • credit,

  • present payment to,

  • update,

  • augment,

  • load,

  • supply.

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