1

Example:

1) Anyone here down for a run tomorrow?

2) I am up for running a few more miles.

I know both mean "being willing to/eager for something". But which is correct?

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  • 2
    Different metaphor. Up refers to increase of eagerness; down refers to being "down on the list", meaning having made a commitment. – John Lawler Jan 7 '18 at 0:30
  • The difference is that of about 25 years in age between who would say which one. – AmE speaker Jan 7 '18 at 2:38
  • Related: What does the phrase "I'm down with" mean? In the early 1980s, I sometimes heard people in New York City shorten the expression "I'm down with that!" to "I'm down!" as in "If you want to do that, I'm down!" It may be the "I'm down for that!" was a variant of "I'm down with that!"—or vice versa. – Sven Yargs Jan 7 '18 at 7:43

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