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I want a word which means 'breaking down some concept and building it again'. To elaborate, suppose I have learnt a concept, but have missed a lot of intricate details in it. So, I want to start from the beginning. I want to dismantle that concept, but not in the sense of destroying or discarding it, or dismantling it because the concept itself is wrong. I want to break it down, and start building it from the basics. Is there a word for this? The Thesaurus suggested words like annihilate, demolish, destroy, tear down, etc. All these words have a negative-sound. I want a word that means the same in a positive sense. As an example, '___-ing Algebra' would be a good title for a book that teaches Algebra from the very basics and in a greater detail than usual.

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    The common phrasing is deconstructing; it’s used widely in PoMo and its descendent disciplines. There, it is neutral-to-positive (because deconstruction is considered critical work). – Dan Bron Jan 6 '18 at 16:47
  • Please show us what your thesaurus searches found unacceptable and why. – tchrist Jan 6 '18 at 17:08
  • @DanBron I can't figure out what PoMo is, and I really tried. I'm guessing not the language of the Pomo indians, nor a slang term for postmodern architecture. – Phil Sweet Jan 6 '18 at 17:46
  • @PhilSweet You hit it with postmodernism. Just not architecture. Academia, lit crit, social sciences, etc. – Dan Bron Jan 6 '18 at 17:47
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    @DanBron In which case I'm more familiar with it as not-a-good-thing. "They could rip it down and replace it with some Po-Monstrosity, but it'd still be saddled with a mobile tower, be tenantless and quite rapidly reach dereliction." [here](theworstofperth.com/2017/01/24/upcycle ) – Phil Sweet Jan 6 '18 at 17:54
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Consider revisit (Collins)

to re-examine (a topic or theme) after an interval, with a view to making a fresh appraisal

or

Develop/redevelop (Collins)

8: If you develop a skill, quality, or relationship, or if it develops, it becomes better or stronger. 12: If you develop an idea, theory, story, or theme, or if it develops, it gradually becomes more detailed, advanced, or complex.

As an example:

'Algebra Revisited' would be a good title for a book that teaches Algebra from the very basics and in a greater detail than usual.

'Redeveloping Algebra' would be a good title for a book that teaches Algebra from the very basics and in a greater detail than usual.

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If you seek to convey the idea you are not simply tearing something apart ("deconstructing") but also contributing by bringing "it" back yet in a different shape, you may consider these terms: reconstruct, refashion, and recast.

They are not as widely used as "deconstruct" in literary criticism, but they transmit a more collaborative approach.

Mind the context, however. "Deconstructing's" high currency in some genres relates to the aversion in PoMo(Postmodern literature) to "construct" things. Building a case sets you up for "deconstruction."

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I do not know if it will suit your sentence, but you can use the word "restoration"

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