4

For all matters in their life or their life and someone's they know.

Someone who can't trust their own instincts or think for themselves.

Someone who needs a mediator to handle affairs instead of trusting and believing that they and the other party can manage it on their own.

Required Sample Sentence:

"I agree," Steve uttered, "She is quite the _________ as she tends to seek someone else's point of view before even considering her own."

  • 'Cautious' and 'tentative' spring to mind, but I do not have a noun to offer. – Nigel J Jan 6 '18 at 11:24
  • I'm circumspect, you're over-cautious, they're insecure. (Someone's [Angel? Mike Riplet?] 'third-person-singular view on life'.) – Edwin Ashworth Jan 6 '18 at 12:58
  • @EdwinAshworth “I’m assertive, you’re aggressive, he’s an a***hole.” – tchrist Jan 7 '18 at 15:58
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Someone who can't trust their own instincts or think for themselves.

...has low self-confidence.

An antonym of self-confidence is self-doubt.

"I agree," Steve uttered, "She is quite the self-doubter as she tends to seek someone else's point of view before even considering her own."

1

This could sound extremely odd, but how about deferrer?

I say this, because when you 'defer to someone', you're essentially accepting their view/opinion on the matter.

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A related colloquial term is "Sheep".

a meek, unimaginative, or easily led person.

Broadly, it applies to anyone who unquestioningly believes in some particular source of information, especially if the speaker believes that source to be flawed. It isn't commonly used if you are trying to express something like "That person is consulting valid sources, but really shouldn't need help answering such a simple question".

1

When describing more specific situations I believe it is easier. For example, I am "hot handy", or "not skilled" when fixing things in the house. Whereas, someone could be simply and more generally "indecisive" if they always seek advice, before an important decision or choice.

  • spelling: not handy – lbf Mar 11 '18 at 0:35

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