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The sentence is:

"Is it ever justifiable for the law to treat some people as inferior to others?"

Can anyone explain the meaning of this question? I am confused about especially the "for the law" part. Is "law" the subject here? Or does it ask that if treating some people as inferior to others is justifiable or not in front of the law?

  • "for the law" is not a constituent phrase in this sentence. It should be looked as "Is it ever justifiable for: the law to treat some people as inferior to others?" – Mark Beadles Dec 28 '17 at 20:56
  • @MarkBeadles thanks for the answer but I still don't get the meaning. Could you explain what the question asks? – ordinaryman Dec 28 '17 at 21:01
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    Your last sentence pretty much answers it. – Cascabel Dec 28 '17 at 21:03
  • Is it ever justifiable for (something) to (do something). Now can you understand it? – Davo Dec 28 '17 at 21:05
  • Related and possible duplicate. – tchrist Dec 28 '17 at 23:28
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"Is it ever justifiable for the law to treat some people as inferior to others?"

can be paraphrased as:

Is [the law treating some people as inferior] ever justifiable?

where "the law" is the subject of an embedded clause.

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