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I've done some searching but still can't fully understand this sentence. Can somebody explain to me?

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    That’s Will Smith in the middle, and actor who rose to fame in a 90s/00s sitcom “Fresh Prince of Bel-Air”. Both the fans are dressed up as his character from that show. The guy on the right in the hat with the camera is dressed up as the kind of instantly-recognizable iconic version of the character from the weekly musical intro. The guy on the left is dressed more obscurely from this scene. That image has become a meme, so the slang “deep cut” must mean either “obscure reference” or “sharp insult”. Unsure which. – Dan Bron Dec 20 '17 at 13:08
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    A deep cut refers to a song (or bit of knowledge) that only devoted fans will recognize. – Davo Dec 20 '17 at 13:15
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    @user159691 I suspect this use of “cut” is slangy and novel enough that its exact sense isn’t recorded in any dictionary yet. I have some friends who speak a similar dialect of English to the one displayed in those comments, and I’ve heard “cut” used for many things, including “track on a record”, which I haven’t heard outside that language community. I’m pretty sure the guy means “obscure reference” (the insult theory is possible but not as credible in this situation, because dressing up as a character, even a meme’d one, reflects enjoyment of that character). – Dan Bron Dec 20 '17 at 13:17
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    @Davo Nice! Well found. So it is an obscure reference. – Dan Bron Dec 20 '17 at 13:18
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    @DanBron it feels like radio station DJs have used the term "deep cut" for a "non-single track" since I was in high school, but I can't decide if this is a Philadelphia specific usage (Will Smith in the OP reference and I both growing up in the area) or a music industry usage (Will Smith being a multiplatinum recording artist as well as actor) – user662852 Dec 20 '17 at 17:56
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A cut is slang for a song, as in a cut off an album. A deep cut is a lesser-known song, one that devoted fans may be familiar with, but average fans might not. In the photo, the dude on the left is dressed up as Will Smith, in a costume seen in an episode of Fresh Prince of Bellaire. Here is a seen from that episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adwT8ZY-XHM.

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@DanBron in the comments posted:

That’s Will Smith in the middle, and actor who rose to fame in a 90s/00s sitcom “Fresh Prince of Bel-Air”.

Both the fans are dressed up as his character from that show. The guy on the right in the hat with the camera is dressed up as the kind of instantly-recognizable iconic version of the character from the weekly musical intro. The guy on the left is dressed more obscurely from this scene. That image has become a meme, so the slang “deep cut” must mean either “obscure reference” or “sharp insult”. Unsure which

I have some friends who speak a similar dialect of English to the one displayed in those comments, and I’ve heard “cut” used for many things, including “track on a record”, which I haven’t heard outside that language community. I’m pretty sure the guy means “obscure reference” (the insult theory is possible but not as credible in this situation, because dressing up as a character, even a meme’d one, reflects enjoyment of that character).

Dec 20 at 13:08 and Dec 20 at 13:17

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  • I'm looking at some Stephen Colbert's old interviews on The Late Show, and one of them has Mathew McConaughey as a guest. Turns out that the charismatic actor is a big fan of a Stephen Colbert's 1992 show. He knows the lines of and punchlines of every skit, Stephen Colbert is astonished, he doesn't even remember the script of the shows because it was so long ago. – Mari-Lou A Dec 30 '17 at 1:22
  • With McConaughey the two perform an old skit from the show and you can tell Mathew knew the lines by heart, there's no need for a teleprompter. A YouTuber writes in the comments section Damn i thought that Stephen had a big crush on him but it seems to go both ways. Cause Exit 57 is a deep cut, I'm still waiting for someone to come and reenact Down In The Basement EDIT: The show was broadcast in 1995 – Mari-Lou A Dec 30 '17 at 1:26
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Sometimes it will mean he went very far. For example, say your teacher gives you a project, with specific instructions, but you, you go for the deep cut and add in a couple more things that will make your project better. Your teacher might say, "Wow! You went for the deep cut!", as in "Wow! You went very far".

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