8

I need the correct term for this one: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exercise_book#/media/File:Exercisebook.jpg

In the German language we just say "Heft". The English term seems to be "exercise book".

But "exercise" is just one aspect of this thing. I can write cooking recipes, my to-do list, my thoughts.

I do not EXERCISE in this thing!

The specific attributes for this thing are:

a) It has about 30 to 80 pages, so it does not need much space.
b) The "cover" is not solid, so I can bend it and it can't break that easy.
c) It is EMPTY at the beginning.
d) It is cheap.

My question is now: Is there another term for it, when I do not use it for school or exercise?

I need special help with the word "book" in "notebook": In the German language, when a thing has "Buch" in it, it is THICKER (more pages). Is this similar in the English language?

  • 2
    In US English, "book" as part of a word does not imply any thickness. In fact, a "Booklet" could refer to specifically a very small number of pages, such as 2. – Kamil Drakari Dec 15 '17 at 17:59
  • 6
    Just to clarify, the use of "exercise" in this context is not physical exercise, but exercise in the context of school work, i.e. some small task that the students are required to do. – Tjaden Hess Dec 15 '17 at 18:29
  • 1
    Don't say a cover is "solid". A book cover that is rigid and resistant to knocks and tears is called a "hardback" in British English but "hardcover" in the US. If a novel has a flexible (bendy) cover it is called "a paperback" in the UK. – Mari-Lou A Dec 15 '17 at 19:16
  • 1
    Re: the title, a workbook. – Mazura Dec 15 '17 at 20:27
14

A notebook is the answer you're looking for.

  • 1
    As in the link the OP provided: "A composition book [...] is a notebook that [...]" – Yorik Dec 15 '17 at 16:48
  • 2
    Here's a dictionary entry to add to your answer. Have a look at Mick's answer for formatting. At EL&U, we like to have answers substantiated by relevant / authoritative references or logical reasoning etc. The idea is that someone reading your answer doesn't need to simply take your word that it is correct - they can check things out for themselves if they wish, based on the links and references you provide. – Lawrence Dec 15 '17 at 16:54
  • 1
    I might add the related word "notepad", which seems like a slightly better match to the OP's thinking. – Kamil Drakari Dec 15 '17 at 18:00
  • 4
    In Canada either journal or notebook would be understood. However I think notebook is more accurate in your case because journal is similar in meaning to diary and I think you're using it to record information in a condensed form (i.e. notes), rather than to describe your day to day life and thoughts. – Al Maki Dec 15 '17 at 18:13
  • @Al Maki. Thank you for your comment. This helped me alot. If you would write this comment as an answer, I would take this answer. – Wolfgang Adamec Dec 15 '17 at 18:33
9

A "journal" is a smallish, usually flexible-covered book of empty pages. It can be used as a diary to write one's thoughts but it can also be used for all the other things you mentioned.

picture from www.galleryleather.com

  • 1
    This sounds very good. It's hard for me to say what's right, since I'm no native speaker. It seems better, because it has no "book" in it. Book (Buch in German) is normally something thicker. – Wolfgang Adamec Dec 15 '17 at 16:55
6

A jotter, perhaps?

jotter noun [ C ] also jotter pad UK

a small book used for making notes in

Cambridge Dictionary

  • 1
    Is jotter also used in the US? My dictionary says, it's a word used in Australia and Great Britain. – Wolfgang Adamec Dec 15 '17 at 16:58
  • 1
    @WolfgangAdamec Notebook is probably better. Jotter was just the first word that came into my head. – Mick Dec 15 '17 at 17:01
  • 2
    Jotter is not used in American English, no. We use 'notebook', usually, or 'composition book', occasionally. (mid-Altantic, Eastern US; regional differences may apply.) We will use "jot" as a verb, however -- eg, to jot something down is to write something quickly. – Roddy of the Frozen Peas Dec 15 '17 at 19:19
5

In Canada either journal or notebook would be understood. However I think notebook is more accurate in your case because journal is similar in meaning to diary and I think you're using it to record information in a condensed form (i.e. notes), rather than to describe your day to day life and thoughts

  • Thank you for your valuable information, I upvoted it. But because I thought that you would not write an answer, I took the anwer of Moonbootica. – Wolfgang Adamec Dec 16 '17 at 7:00
4

That particular thing your image depicts is a blue book, whose main function is to serve as a place to write answers to a test or examination, especially those requiring essays. But if you use it for something other than its main function, you can still call it a blue book. I write my recipes in a blue book, for example. If you are asking about something other than a blue book, you should post an image of something else

  • Wow! I've never heard that except maybe in lyrics or a movie (and I didn't get the reference). Is it regional? I know the phrase as it's used for car value, aircraft and in NSW Australia, baby health information records. – paulzag Dec 16 '17 at 10:01
2

In a historical context, the term "commonplace book" was used for the kind of book you appear to be describing. It's occasionally still used, but is obviously much less common than notebook.

-1

The "Note book" or "note pad" is the answer.

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