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Which of these two is correct? Present perfect or simple past? The more I look at it the more I can't decide:

I've fallen in love with seafood around the time I found your channel.

or:

I fell in love with seafood around the time I found your channel.

I also could use when instead of "around the time" but I think that changes the premise of the situation. I'd appreciate a little help!

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Let's replace around the time I found your channel with yesterday, as those phrases are grammatically interchangeable (the "around your time" is just an approximation; it could also be replaced with "in approximately 400BC").

I've fallen in love with seafood yesterday. I've fallen in love with seafood in approximately 400BC.

I fell in love with seafood yesterday. I fell in love with seafood in approximately 400BC.

Don't let the length of the phrase "around the time I found your channel" fool you. It's still a fixed point in time, making your second sentence grammatically correct.

Compare:

I've fallen in love now that I've seen your show.

vs:

I fell in love around the time I saw your show.

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    You state that 'your second sentence is 'grammatically correct' but you have not commented on the first. – Nigel J Dec 14 '17 at 20:20
  • The first isn't correct – Ben Mansley Dec 14 '17 at 20:28
  • The first needs work: I've fallen in love with seafood since around the time I found your channel. – Davo Dec 14 '17 at 21:29
  • Sorry for not clarifying. As Ben said, the first is not correct. – JeezLouise Dec 15 '17 at 20:59
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JeezLouise did a fine job of answering. I'd like to add: for the second sentence, "around the time" does in fact suggest a different idea than "when."

"When I found your channel" implies that you basically fell in love because of their channel. "Around the time" suggests that in the process of discovering seafood, you ended up falling in love with their channel. Very subtle difference but completely different meanings, especially on the compliment level.

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Since you're talking about something that occurred in the past, you really should replace 'I've' (I have) with 'I'd' (I had).

I'd fallen in love with seafood around the time I found your channel.

  • Should I really? I feel that would change the meaning entirely. I'm still in love with seafood. Using "had" would mean that I was in love with seafood but not anymore, wouldn't it? I'm not arguing the correctness of the sentence this way (because it definitely works with a fixed time where as "have" does not) only the meaning change. – Peter Dec 16 '17 at 3:07
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I would suggest: As soon as I found your channel, I fell in love with seafood.

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