0

In editing the following sentence, I would like to use perfect parallel construction for the latter part of the sentence — that is, ideally I’d like to get rid of "in." But that would make the sentence grammatically incorrect, right? Or do you think it’s okay as it is? Any suggestions?

Only a few have the goal of becoming the best on their team, company, or in the world.

  • 1
    I can't see what is wrong in using in for all of them. – Mick Dec 13 '17 at 19:56
  • 1
    Best in team? Seriously? – Xanne Dec 13 '17 at 21:39
  • You can use of for each of them. Or you can say best on their team, in their company, or in the world. – Drew Dec 13 '17 at 22:29
  • Only a few have the goal of becoming the best teammate, employee, or global citizen. – Jim Dec 14 '17 at 5:25
1

I think 'in' is fine. If you leave it out, it's like saying 'the world' is doing something, in the sentence. Like, 'the world' itself has the goal of becoming the best on its team...' which isn't what you mean.

If you wanted more contrast between the two parts, you could say 'only a very few have the goal of becoming the best on their team, company or in the world'

Or, only an elite few. Or only a rare few.

Which creates a more see-saw effect in the sentence which heightens its meaning and makes it more easy to understand, because we see more the contrast between the two parts. 😊

1

Use three different prepositions to create a more "balanced" parallel structure:

Only a few have the goal of becoming the best on their team, at their company, or in the world.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.