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All references that I've come across list "absorb" only as a transitive verb, yet I find it used commonly in the medical and advertising community intransitively. For example, "Our vitamin C absorbs more quickly". I want to ask, what does it absorb, as absorb is a transitive verb needing an object: "Our brand of paper towel absorbs liquid more quickly than brand X."--edited. On the other hand a word such as "assimilate" can be used both transitively and intransitively. Whether a word is transitive only or both transitive and intransitive seems to be rather arbitrary, and and I find people taking liberties to speed the process of making transitive verbs into intransitive verbs, for their convenience, I assume; so rather than say the vitamin C is absorbed into the bloodstream they will say the vitamin C absorbs into the bloodstream, which is grammatically incorrect. Adding "into the bloodstream" does not make it any less an intransitive usage in the latter case.

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    By the way what is "POB"? I'm new to this site. – Dustin G Dec 10 '17 at 20:53
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    JEL -- I will gladly reframe my question; it does rather beg the question. But I was trying to think of a way to put my observation in question form. – Dustin G Dec 10 '17 at 20:57
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    JEL --I have changed the title; is it more acceptable now? – Dustin G Dec 10 '17 at 21:03
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    This happens a lot in English: the result is traditionally called a "middle voice" (because it parallels a construction of that name in Ancient Greek), and in more modern works an unaccusative verb – Colin Fine Dec 10 '17 at 21:20
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    I think you’re quite right and Our vitamin C absorbs more quickly is wrong but context could make the same construction grammatical. Our towel/sponge/cloth absorbs more quickly works, does it not? Advertising is built on not one but two vital planks… secondly anything technical but first and by far foremost, how senior is whoever thought up the idea? – Robbie Goodwin Dec 11 '17 at 21:29

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