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"The ethical standard is to abstain from sexual intimacies with colleagues or with staff for whom you have supervisory, evaluative, or instructional responsibility."

Does the above sentence mean that the standard is to abstain from sexual intimates with all colleagues, but only with staff for whom they have responsibility? Or does the sentence mean that the standard is to abstain from sexual intimacies with colleagues for whom they have responsibility and with staff for whom they have responsibility?

  • It's ambiguous. You'd have to ask the author. – Mike Harris Dec 13 '17 at 2:33
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It's simple. Your colleagues are your peers, your co-workers on the same team as you, not your boss or your own reports. It says don't have sex with them.

The other part says also don't have sex with people you supervise, or you evaluate, or you instruct.

If that is too hard to understand, then it's even simpler: don't have sex with people who work for the same folks you work for. Period. It's just asking for trouble.

It doesn't take a doctorate in English to understand this directive. Common sense suffices. Would that it were as common as its name would seem to imply.

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