0

This is my first question on english.stackexchange.com/questions/ask. Could anyone tell me the meaning of "Twice Upon a Time"? It's the title of Doctor Who's Christmas special episode, the last of this ongoing season. I have been browsing the web for quite some time now and been exposed to a variety of uncertain answers.

11
  • an event that occurred twice in a specific time/time frame? I'm not sure Commented Dec 6, 2017 at 7:29
  • Context is everything. Where did you find this expression?
    – oerkelens
    Commented Dec 6, 2017 at 7:42
  • It's the title of Doctor who's Christmas special episode ,last of this ongoing season
    – MUMBAS
    Commented Dec 6, 2017 at 7:45
  • I think you'll have to figure that one out for yourself, but it may well have to do with the fact that it starts with two doctors. This is not a phrase in common usage.
    – Lee Leon
    Commented Dec 6, 2017 at 8:25
  • 1
    I think it is what you asked for, because it is a one-of wordplay. The standard expression i s_once upon a time_ and normally there is one doctor. Supposedly someone familiar with the expression once upon a time would see the playful connection between the mangled twice upon a time and the fact that there are two doctors now.
    – oerkelens
    Commented Dec 6, 2017 at 9:42

1 Answer 1

2

As you say, "Twice Upon a Time" is the title of the Doctor Who 2017 Christmas Special.

It's playing with the standard expression "Once upon a time," traditionally used to introduce fairy stories and the like.

There is normally only one eponymous doctor in the show. This one features two.

See this promotional link.

Twice Upon a Time will see Peter Capaldi’s Twelfth Doctor team up with his earlier self the First Doctor (David Bradley), as the pair both try to avoid regenerating (and therefore changing their appearance and personality).

Personally, I am looking forward to watching it!

Now that I've watched the show (some time ago), I've edited my post to add Lawrence's comment.

It could also be a reference to the Doctor (single person, albeit appearing in two forms at the same time) needing to make the same decision twice, with the decision-making processes linked to each other temporally and perhaps organically (for want of a better term) as well.

3
  • 1
    It could also be a reference to the Doctor (single person, albeit appearing in 2 forms at the same time) needing to make the same decision twice, with the decision-making processes linked to each other temporally and perhaps organically (for want of a better term) as well.
    – Lawrence
    Commented Feb 5, 2018 at 6:12
  • @Lawrence, indeed. Now that I have actually seen the show, I think your explanation is good.
    – Livrecache
    Commented Feb 5, 2018 at 22:40
  • Feel free to add it to your answer.
    – Lawrence
    Commented Feb 5, 2018 at 23:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.