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Is there an easier way to say " an entire bar devoid of notes" in english?

I'm referring to music notation, when a bar has no notes and a whole rest must be used as a result. I want to know if there's a technical word for the quote I provided, a word that would explain that situation without having to describe it.

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    This is called a "whole rest", as you say; for most time signatures, a whole rest is used regardless of the actual length of the measure. – Mark Beadles Dec 5 '17 at 17:55
  • If you need to describe it in non-musical terms, you could say a bar of silence. – Jason P Sallinger Dec 5 '17 at 17:56
  • @MarkBeadles If that's the answer then post it as an answer XD – The Beast Dec 5 '17 at 17:59
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    Yes, a technical word is what I was looking for. Still, it might not be considered off-topic so feel free to post it as an answer. Either way it wouldn't affect you and you did help giving me an answer. – The Beast Dec 5 '17 at 18:12
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    @Jason P Sallinger - A silent bar is when no-one is playing. In an orchestral score, some instruments may have one or more bars' rest while others are playing. – Kate Bunting Dec 6 '17 at 9:22
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This is called a "whole rest", as you say; for most time signatures, a whole rest is used regardless of the actual length of the measure.

  • How very interesting. – Lambie Dec 5 '17 at 21:08

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