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Is the sentence below considered complex because of the subordinate clause beginning with "as", or should it be considered a fragment because "It is" is not an independent clause and therefore does not express a complete thought?

"It is as impossible for most men to comprehend a world of goodness without sin as it is for most men to comprehend an earth without the sky."

  • I think it was a mistake to bump this to the homepage. It's a dumb question to start with, and the OP hasn't been back for a year. What does society gain from this? – John Lawler Jul 31 '18 at 14:38
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In a comment, BillJ wrote:

The subject is "it". The sentence as a whole is the matrix (main) clause. It has a couple of subordinate clauses, bracketed here: "It is as impossible [for most men to comprehend a world of goodness without sin] as it is [for most men to comprehend an earth without the sky]".

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