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This question already has an answer here:

So when I was promoted to president of the club, I took the opportunity to introduce new events.

From my experience as president of Pre-med Club, I can confidently say that leadership is about encouraging constructive interpersonal interactions between people.

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, Rob_Ster, choster, Xanne, jimm101 Nov 28 '17 at 11:33

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When mentioning a role in general, it’s often left lowercase:

A president is the head of affairs.

A governor’s responsibility is to govern.

He served on a panel of judges.

The administrators of the school are set to meet tomorrow.

When referring to a specific role or using it as an honorific or form of address, it’s capitalised:

Abraham Lincoln was the President of the United States.

I visited Governor Smith and Mayor Lee last week.

He served on the Panel of Judges.

That’s a very good idea, Administrator Paulsen.

In your examples, I would write:

“…when I was promoted to president of the club…” (generic title)

“From my experience as President of Pre-med Club…” (official title)

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