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This question already has an answer here:

In this situation below What does “that's as good as it's going to get” mean?

A: Hey, B! #$#J3293~(babbling)?

B: What?

C: He(A) wants to ask you(B) to go to the dance party together.

B: that's as good as it's going to get, isn't it?

C: I'm afraid so.

I have no idea what it means.

Is that means "I'd love to?"

I need your help.

marked as duplicate by AmE speaker, Hot Licks, JMP, Scott, Cascabel Jul 31 '18 at 17:41

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  • Not the right expression in this situation--but you're in luck, the question has been asked and answered before: english.stackexchange.com/questions/276865/… – Xanne Nov 26 '17 at 5:58
  • Thx! I'll check it – Jacob Nov 26 '17 at 9:18
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    I'm glad you want to participate, but if this is from a particular story, you should cite it. – Spencer Jun 27 '18 at 13:18
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It means "I'm not going to get anything better, am I?"

as good as it gets [informal]

Used to say that nothing better is possible or available:

  • It's not a great restaurant, but in this part of the city, it's as good as it gets.

Used to say that something is very good and cannot be improved:

  • There's nothing I enjoy more than spending time at home with my family. That's as good as it gets.

Merriam Webster: as good as it gets

  • Oh, thx! I got it. you mean, it is usually used when people think this is the best thing if they consider the condition. OR, when people want to say "This is the best thing i can get." thanks for answering my question. – Jacob Nov 26 '17 at 9:17
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    A lot depends on the tone of voice. If said with a tone of resignation/exasperation it means "I'm not real happy with it but it's better than nothing". – Hot Licks Apr 26 '18 at 1:54
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It would be nice if you could provide a reference of where this conversation is taken from, but I'll answer as I understand it from what little context is present.

  1. A asks B to go to the dance
  2. B can't understand what A says, so B asks "What?"
  3. C 'translates' what A said for B
  4. B states "That's as good as it's going to get" then asks "isn't it?" The meaning here is two part: 1st a statement that A is not going to be able to communicate this in a better way than they just did; 2nd asking for verification from C as to whether this statement is correct or not, effectively turning the whole sentence into a question.
  5. C states that B is correct.

Basically it means "That was terrible, but it's the best A can do, isn't it?"

  • Note: I'm answering this long after the question was asked, as it came up on the front page, and I didn't think the existing answer fully covered what it meant in this specific instance. For a dictionary definition, see Mick's answer, this is more of an answer to "How would a native English speaker understand this?" – 3D1T0R Jul 27 '18 at 23:22

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