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The verb "research" generally fits into academic or otherwise professional settings. As Oxford English Dictionary defines it, research is

  1. Investigate systematically

    1.1 Discover or verify information for use in (a book, programme, etc.)

With this in mind, what verb can I use to describe the research that I did in a setting similar to the following:

I just found out that we can go to St. Clements during our visit to London.

Would I say

I was looking into where we could visit and just found out that we can go to St. Clements during our stay in London.

or is this acceptable

I was researching about where we could visit and just found out that we can go to St. Clements during our stay in London.

Alternatively, you may also consider this

I was investigating where we could visit and just found out...

Here is the definition of "investigate" in Oxford English Dictionary: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/investigate

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  • I like "look into." Also, you can lower the formality of "research" by saying "internet research" instead, e.g. "I did some internet research." Nov 26, 2017 at 4:32

1 Answer 1

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Looking into sounds most natural in my opinion. Researching and investigating both sound too formal. I think this is a matter of idiom or usage ― simply the way people speak ― rather than a dictionary definition. Now that many people use the Internet to answer their questions, I suppose research is what they are doing. But to say "I was investigating where we could visit" is to risk sounding very pretentious. Research and investigate are too inflated for the mere act of looking at a few websites without needed any special skills to find out what the favorite tourist spots are.

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  • I think it depends to the situation of getting the right information or idea. Using internet pages: "I visited some tourist information sites on the web and discovered an amazing place called St. Clements." or " I spend 2 days in comparing all available flight prices. Finally, flights in September will be the cheapest."
    – FrankMK
    Nov 25, 2017 at 20:56

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