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Suppose Ally sent an email to Bob to let him know the due date for submission of the document Bob is working on. Ally cc'd me in the email so I learned about the due date as well. Bob, in all likelihood, must have noticed my name in the CC section and knows that I also know about the deadline, but he has not discussed it with me till today. Perhaps he has been too busy.

Now, the deadline is approaching and I want to give Bob a friendly reminder.

Would it be correct to write in my next email to him:

Ally has cc'd me in her recent email about the submission deadline. Do you think you can finish the document by the end of the week?

Or would it be better to say:

Ally cc'd me in her recent email about the submission deadline..."?

The second might be preferred considering these sentences refer to an email that was sent at a specific point in time and both Bob and I are aware of it. But then people often use the present progressive to start a new topic (i.e. "So the CEO has resigned. What you think will happen next?") even when both the speaker and listener know the event has happened.

Any thoughts?

Thanks.

2 Answers 2

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The first one is correct. It uses the perfect tense, which highlights that what matters is the consequence of the past event on the present. We are not focused on when it happened in the past.

In this, they explain:

The present perfect tense is used to describe something that happened in the past, but the exact time it happened is not important. It has a relationship with the present.

In your other example about the CEO, the present perfect tense is also correct: we are not focused on the past event, but on its consequences on the present.

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  • Thank you. I can see why the exact time the email was cc'ed is not important in my examples but again, the present perfect cannot be used with a specific time and I thought this might have some relevant to my question. So "Ally has cc'ed me in an email on October 15" would not work. How about "Ally has cc'ed me in her recent email dated October 15"?
    – Barouche
    Commented Nov 25, 2017 at 10:15
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The second one is correct. “cc’ed”

It's the simple past tense, implying connection to the events you're discussing, that is, the email to which you are referring.

“has cc’ed” is the perfect tense, implying that it's something that happened and was finished before the events under discussion. In this context it might suggest that you were cc’ed in previous emails, before the one under discussion.

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  • I think you have it backwards. In "ecenglish.com/learnenglish/how-use-present-perfect" they say "The present perfect tense is used to describe something that happened in the past, but the exact time it happened is not important. It has a relationship with the present."
    – DevShark
    Commented Nov 23, 2017 at 16:59

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