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I am studying english and I saw this rule: The book is on the table/ but The book is on a little table

The flowers are in the vase / The flowers are in a beautiful vase.

The rule says that one can use any noun, adjective and preposition here, but when you define the noun with the adjective in such structures with the preposition, you should use the indefinite article.

So we have the same situation here (ex.:The flowers are in the vase / The flowers are in a beautiful vase.), but if we define the noun "vase" we should use the indefinite article. Is this true? Does this rule always work? I would appreciate it if somebody clarify this for me.

  • Finik, could you take that Question to English Language Learners, please? Your rule suggests a choice between The book is on the table or … a little table but they're different things, not alternatives. Your flowers might be in both the vase and a beautiful vase. … a little table is a loose description, not a specific definition. A beautiful vase also defines nothing. A definition requiring the definite article the would need The vase is on the little table, not the big one or the flower is in the beautiful vase, not the ugly one. – Robbie Goodwin Nov 17 '17 at 21:38

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