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Should I use "the" before proper nouns? I would like to skip it, will it be grammatically correct?

Example: MicroApp receives the SL Recovery Key, the LF Service Key, and the Auth Key to control user transactions.

In my case, the proper nouns are the names for software components. In comparing with other applications, the names are unique: other apps use different names for software components. Within my application, the names aren't unique: every name represents the class of objects: LF Service Key is a name for every TL Service Key for every app user.

I am describing software components in general (their functions, threats, compatibility, etc.), not for every user.

Many thanks in forward!

  • Why do you believe these are proper nouns? – aschepler Nov 7 '17 at 23:41
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    I am non-native speaker with rich fantasy) Maybe I should relate them to proper names – Mary Nov 7 '17 at 23:50
  • The definite article is always correct, since every executing program is an instance created from a type. Loading the executable file is like stamping out a cookie with a cookie cutter. A program component is usually not unique enough to warrant a proper noun, and although there are exceptions, IMHO you should write your draft with the articles and allow the reviewers to revise them in line with your company's general usage. – Global Charm Nov 8 '17 at 1:15
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I don't know about these being proper nouns, but I do believe that based on your description, "the" should be used before each key as you've shown them above

  • Proper or not, all nouns require articles. If the reference is specific, the blahnoun will be necessary; if it’s generic, a blahnoun. Further Proper nouns always and improper nouns never require capitals. Nothing else you mention makes any difference. Mary, please remember articles are one of the most-difficult aspects of English for non-natives to learn; particularly mid-Europeans… they’re difficult purely because they seem wholly unnatural. Non-natives simply have no basis for comparison. Technical has no place here. – Robbie Goodwin Nov 8 '17 at 22:03
  • You're welcome and FMI, what's your native land or language, please? – Robbie Goodwin Nov 12 '17 at 20:42
  • Ukraine, Ukrainian & Russian – Mary Dec 4 '17 at 2:54

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