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Could you please help me to understand the meaning of the sentence that I have written below? When I translated into my language, I am given the meaning of "however" as "along with that". But I haven't seen before this usage of "however".

Not all learning teams, however, are equally effective.

  • ***I haven't seen before the usage of "however" like that – Hasan Oct 24 '17 at 18:00
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    Hi, Hasan, welcome to EL&U. I've slightly edited your question; feel free to change my edits or edit further on your own. You can use the "edit" link at the lower left of your question (between "share" and "flag", I think). In general, I'd say you're right that "however" doesn't mean "along with that"—in this case, I'd say it means something like "but" (moved to the beginning of the sentence). You may also be interested in our sister site, English Language Learners. – 1006a Oct 24 '17 at 18:16
  • Oh, thank you:) Time is getting late here and I was not aware of it. I have just signed up the website. I guess I missed it because of the time and signing up new. I will definitely take a look the link that you have given. – Hasan Oct 24 '17 at 18:22
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As a British English speaker, I would take that sentence to offer either a caveat to the argument so far or a rebuttal to a conclusion that the author thinks you might be taking but which is inappropriate. So I'd expect it to be embedded in something like:

Teams comprising students who had never met showed the same test results as those who were well acquainted. Not all learning teams, however, are equally effective. Teams comprising three students who knew each other and three who had never met suffered in comparison to other participants.

Or:

Teams comprising students who had never met showed the same test results as those who were well acquainted. Not all learning teams, however, are equally effective: teams who were well acquainted scored better when tested again a month later.

So I would accept it to mean "along with that" if the latter is intended to introduce a nuance and some element of contrast is intended.

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The placement of the word 'however' is very normal. I can't be sure without the surrounding context, but in this usage, it is usually equivalent to "on the other hand" or "despite this", in both cases marking an apparent contrast with something from a previous sentence.

"Along with that" is kind of a bland phrase, and it could usually fit, too, but it does not express the contrast that "however" expresses, that you would normally not expect it to be that way.

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