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The word "equivocal" sounds like "talking with the same (one) voice". But in the English language it seems to mean explicitly "ambiguous" (= "talking with two voices/tongues/meanings").

How can this be understood?


Having thought about it a bit longer, my guess is: "equivocal" means "of the same sound (but of different meanings)", not "of the same voice (= with the same meaning)".

The question then goes into this direction:

Did lat. "vox" semantically evolve into different directions, to mean more of a "sound (vocal)" (transporting possibly equivocal meanings) or more of a "voice" (transporting an unequivocal meaning).


Is there are deeper but comprehensible etymological origin of "vox"?

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