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What phrase or term may be used in semi-formal writing (e.g. a news article or opinion essay) to refer to someone whose area of study or research is women's studies? I considered "women's studies person", "women's student", and "women studier" but, while amusing, none of these seem adequate.

Example usage:

Women's studies person Jane Doe coined the term "mansplaining", arguing that explaining something while being a man is inherently sexist.

  • "Expert"? "Researcher"? To make this easier, imagine you were talking about "zoology" instead of "women's studies". – Max Williams Oct 19 '17 at 8:38
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    That would be zoologist. The problem with finding a Greek-derived word here is that gynaecologist is already taken. I guess I'm guilty of mansplaining that. – Andrew Leach Oct 19 '17 at 9:08
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    Women's studies scholar? – StoneyB Oct 19 '17 at 13:41
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Woman's Studies Mistress

mistress
"the woman or girl whom an animal is accustomed to obey" (OED) , the animal here obviously being any mansplainer.

Or a more staid definition (again from the OED)

"A female teacher; a woman qualified to teach, or particularly accomplished in some subject, skill, etc" Sub-definition:
"A female tutor or teacher, esp. in a school; a woman who teaches a particular subject."

Women's studies mistress Jane Doe coined the term "mansplaining", arguing that explaining something while being a man is inherently sexist.

  • Yet not every student of women's studies is necessarily a woman or would otherwise be accurately addressed or described as mistress... – oerkelens Oct 19 '17 at 12:13
  • Heh. I was led astray by the OP using Jane Doe. – AmE speaker Oct 19 '17 at 12:15
  • Mistress is basically an archaic term for a female teacher. It is a somewhat less archaic term for a woman who a married man is cheating with. I do not think you'd want to use it do describe a feminist scholar. – stevesliva Oct 19 '17 at 13:44

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