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I was practicing the writing of Toefl exam. The topic is:

The opinions of celebrities, such as famous entertainers and athletes, are more important to younger people than they are to older people.

I want to say that young people usually use the internet a lot, so they have more chance to see the show of celebrities.

Can I use the following sentence as a topic sentence?

Celebrities such famous entertainers and athletes are more accessible for young people than older people.

I am not sure the usage of "accessible".

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  • Are you saying that a young person has a greater "ability to reach" an individual than an older person? Do you lose ability to use a tool with age?
    – Stan
    Oct 18 '17 at 15:24
  • Not a point of English, but doesn't less time on the Internet leave older people with more time to watch TV etc? Oct 18 '17 at 15:46
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    I am not sure that the usage of "accessible"" is wrong here, but its possible meanings are too ambiguous to use, I would think. I would have thought a phrase like "meaningful to" or "relevant to" or "relatable to" would probably be better.
    – Lee Leon
    Oct 18 '17 at 16:05
  • @stan I am saying that young people tend to be the environment which involves celebrities because young people use the internet a lot.
    – Coda Chang
    Oct 18 '17 at 16:43
  • @EdwinAshworth my point is that young people use cellphone all the time, so they probably reach more celebrities than older people.
    – Coda Chang
    Oct 18 '17 at 16:45
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pervasive and its related forms: prevalent is closer to the desired connotation of accessibility in the OP's question.

A suggestion paraphrasing the OP's title (with fair bit of modification):

Cult of celebrities, such as famous entertainers and athletes, is more prevalent among youth than among mature people.

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Celebrities such as famous entertainers and athletes are more accessible for to younger people than older people.

Erratum: It isn't celebrities themselves, but celebrity culture/gossip etc. that is more pervasive in youth culture.

Influential is correct for "The opinions of celebrities, such as famous entertainers and athletes, are more important to younger people than they are to older people." but it isn't entirely correct for "Celebrities such famous entertainers and athletes are more accessible for young people than older people."

The cult of celebrity can be both pervasive/accessible and influential, but celebrity can only be influential; celebrity cannot be accessible.

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Celebrities such famous entertainers and athletes are more accessible for young people than older people.

Promoters and publicists work to give the impression that their celebrity clients are accessible. Age does not limit the appeal, per se.

ac·ces·si·ble
adjective
1. (of a place) able to be reached or entered.
"the town is accessible by bus"
synonyms: reachable, attainable, approachable;
2. (of a person, typically one in a position of authority or importance) friendly and easy to talk to; approachable.
"he is more accessible than most tycoons"
synonyms: approachable, friendly, agreeable, obliging, congenial, affable, cordial, welcoming, easygoing, pleasant
"Professor Cooper is very accessible"

If the opinions of celebrities are more important to younger people than they are to older people, you might say that celebrities are more influential with younger people than older people. Of course, you'd also have to defend your position with a supporting argument.

in·flu·en·tial
adjective
1. having great influence on someone or something.
"her work is influential in feminist psychology"
synonyms: powerful, dominant, controlling, strong, authoritative, persuasive;
noun: influential; plural noun: influentials
1. an influential person.

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  • A down-vote? Really! Astonishing.
    – Stan
    Oct 18 '17 at 16:15
  • (1) You still haven't attributed and linked to the references. (2) Looking up a word OP uses is not a philosophy encouraged on ELU. (3) You don't answer the question, which now seems essentially to be "Can I say 'Celebrities such as famous entertainers and athletes are more accessible for young people than older people' with the meaning 'Young people can interact more easily with these people than older folk can'?" (4) Adding a definition for 'influential' is certainly not answering the question. Only one down-vote? Astounding. Oct 18 '17 at 18:13
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    I appreciate everyone here, but please be peace.
    – Coda Chang
    Oct 18 '17 at 18:30
  • I'd downvote your comment if I could, Edwin. ;-) Oct 18 '17 at 19:06
  • @EdwinAshworth Thanks for a thoughtful comment in point form no less.
    – Stan
    Oct 18 '17 at 20:49
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There are two things going on here:

  • Influence and
  • Reach

The first is the influence or affect that celebrities exert by being role-models or icons which means that they influence the behaviour of others who want to ‘be like them’ or emulate them.

The second is the reach that is provided by communications methods, duch as the internet, that provide ‘ease of connection’ to such icons.

The problem in your second sentence, is that the word ‘accessible’ - can mean either of the above.

So consider - do you mean: - more accessible - as the icons are easy to relate to (they ‘get into the minds of the young’ easily), or - more accessible - as they can be easily reached on the internet?

To adjust your sentence to clarify that ambiguity, I suggest:

Celebrities such (as) famous entertainers and athletes are more accessible for young people than older people - both because they have characteristics that the young desire to emulate, and because they are now very easily accessible via the internet, blogging, etc.

I added the ‘as’ because it was missing in your sentence. You need the ‘as’ for grammatical correctness.

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