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I haven't been able to infer whether latin characters are different from English alphabet or English alphabet are a subset of latin characters, as I came across several versions of latin.

Trying to find an answer as one of the driving rules of a foreign country says details on license should be in latin characters, so I am wondering whether my information printed in English qualifies for being in Latin?

marked as duplicate by sumelic, Mari-Lou A, Davo, Centaurus, Gary Nov 13 '17 at 15:49

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    Yes, what is typically referred to as the "English alphabet" also qualifies as Latin characters – sumelic Oct 17 '17 at 6:50
  • @sumelic Cool, thanks for confirming! You can post that as an answer if you are certain so that I can accept it. – Ashfame Oct 17 '17 at 6:52
  • "I am wondering whether my information printed in English qualifies for being in Latin?" Well, no: English and Latin are two different languages, albeit using character sets/alphabets which are practically identical. – Andrew Leach Oct 17 '17 at 7:15
  • @AndrewLeach Well may be not the same on a semantic level but it does mean information printed as "Ashish Kumar" qualifies for being in Latin, which is what it seems like from links provided by sumelic. Correct? – Ashfame Oct 17 '17 at 7:26
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    Since this appears to be about information for an Indian license, it seems most likely that they are expecting you to write your name transliterated into Latin characters, probably with no diacritics. That means that you should not write अाशीष कुमर (or however exactly you’d write it) in Devanāgarī. You probably also shouldn’t write Āśīṣ Kumar (as some transliteration schemes would represent it), since that contains fairly advanced diacritics. Ashish Kumar is probably what is intended. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Oct 17 '17 at 9:45

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