1

Can you please tell me the technical term that refers to the situation when my car insurance company provides me some compensatory rewards e.g. discount in next year's insurance, cash amount etc. because they cannot provide the damaged parts of my car? Thanks.

Sample sentence:

As a ___, our company is providing one year's free insurance because we are not able to obtain the spare parts for your particular vehicle.

6
  • 1
    Hi Mike, and welcome to EL&U. I've added a couple of relevant tags to your question. How would you use the term in a sentence? – Lawrence Oct 16 '17 at 7:18
  • Thanks @Lawrence this is my first question on english stackexchange so didn't know what tags to add. I would use this in a legal application like - As a TERMHERE company is providing one year's free insurance because we are not able to obtain the spare parts for your particular vehicle.. – Mohit Bhardwaj Oct 16 '17 at 7:21
  • 1
    No problem, and thanks for the sample sentence. This gives the community an idea of the context. I've edited it slightly and popped it into your question. Comments on Stack Exchange are treated as ephemeral and may be deleted at a whim, whereas question and answer posts are more permanent. There are further guidelines on the single-word-requests tag info page, accessible from the tag's tooltips pop-up. – Lawrence Oct 16 '17 at 7:25
  • 2
    I'm not sure that this situation would be one where a good-will gesture, for instance, would fit. Insurance companies spell out in great detail in their contracts what they will do in various eventualities. A good-will gesture might be when a supermarket say replaces the stale tin of biscuits you've just bought, and gives you two more tins for the inconvenience you've incurred. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 16 '17 at 8:44
  • 2
    Having worked in the trade, I would be furious. The Insurance Company ought to buy the car off you, if they cannot source the parts. – Nigel J Oct 16 '17 at 9:00
1

This question is a bit confusing, because the word or phrase that the insurance company might use is different from the actual thing they're describing.

For example, they might use the phrase "goodwill gesture" or "compensation", as other answers have suggested, but it is actually neither of those things: it's a blatant attempt to avoid fulfilling their contractual obligations: so you could say they are trying to "weasel out of the contract", or "fob you off", or "wriggle out of replacing the parts", etc.

So, what you would say, and what they might say, are very different. It's not clear which of these two things you're actually asking about.

If this is a real situation, then your response should obviously be "No thank you: I would like you to replace the parts, as per our contract. If this is not possible then you may need to replace the entire vehicle, as the contract states you would return the car to its original condition", or something along those lines.

1
  • Thanks Max. I just felt that it is something that has a technical name, but seems like there is not any specific technical term for this. – Mohit Bhardwaj Oct 16 '17 at 10:46
2

It would appear the company are compensating you via an alternative method other than spare parts.

I would therefore use 'compensation'.

As compensation, our company is providing one year's free insurance because we are not able to obtain the spare parts for your particular vehicle.

0

I would say the word: "policy".

As by our policy, our company is providing one year's free insurance because we are not able to obtain the spare parts for your particular vehicle.

1
  • 1
    IF the insurance policy explicitly says that might happen. – Spencer Oct 17 '17 at 1:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.