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All my life I've been looking for a single word in English to describe SOMEONE WHO DRAWS. It would be the equivalent of "a painter", or "a ceramicist", or "a sculptor".

"Draftsman" has a technical slant to it. "Illustrator" implies that the drawing accompanies text or implies a particular meaning. A "Drawer" is part of a piece of furniture.

Haven't found anyone on either side of the Atlantic who has a good answer.

  • Hello, Emily. 'Painter' also means a rope used to tie up a boat. (Though this is actually a different word, a homograph.) If you're happy to carry on using 'painter' to mean 'one who paints', why can't 'drawer' be used to mean 'one who draws'? Have you checked in a dictionary? – Edwin Ashworth Oct 13 '17 at 23:58
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    /drɔr/ the sliding, box-like open container that is found in cabinets, wardrobes, and chests. /drɔ ər/ for the person who draws. Listen to the pronunciations here: dictionary.com/browse/drawer. Maybe this is yet another British English versus American English difference... (I pronounce the name of the artist differently from the piece of furniture) However, there are lots of online dictionaries that define "drawer" as a person who draws. – Mari-Lou A Oct 14 '17 at 12:25
  • Well, if I describe Vincent Van Gough as a painter, I don't think there's much risk of someone thinking that I've got a piece of rope with a famous name. And yes, it did occur to me to look in a dictionary for this - when I was about 10. Most dictionaries describe a "drawer" with the following definitions: a boxlike compartment, underpants, one who takes money from a bank account, and someone who draws. My entire point is that NO ONE ACTUALLY uses the word "draw-er" as one who draws. The pronunciation alone is unwieldy and causes one to say it with an exaggerated Southern (USA) accent. – Emily Canter Nov 16 '17 at 0:12
  • Again, folks - Please imagine an introduction in which you describe what you do. But you don't work with paint, and you aren't a composer, or a singer, or a sculptor, or a playwright. You draw pictures. Is it really the best thing to say, "I am a drawer." I KNOW the dictionary states that "drawer" is correct (way down in the list of definitions), but my ORIGINAL POINT is that "drawer" isn't a great term for this usage. Was hoping for a more extensive vocabulary. Any Britons here? Actually, any drawers here? – Emily Canter Nov 16 '17 at 0:26
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Drawer

Oxford dictionary definition 3

A person who produces a drawing or design.

Examples

‘The fact that these three are expert drawers and painters doesn't hurt either.’

‘The drawer's signature will be executed just above it.’

‘Jordy had always been a good drawer, he could draw trees amazingly.’

‘You've spoken about being a drawer, painter, writer too, as well as composer.’

  • As @Reg Dwight has said, '[W]e write stuff in comments that is too obvious to qualify for an answer. [This] is not [appropriate] for a site for linguists and etymologists. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 13 '17 at 23:18
  • I think it’s a good question. And besides that 99% of the questions here are off topic. I’ve given up trying to reform/save the site from itself. @EdwinAshworth – AmE speaker Oct 13 '17 at 23:30
  • The question has potential, though OP should have done the simple research you feel it necessary to supply. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 13 '17 at 23:35
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    I've upvoted because it's the only acceptable answer, but it's worth pointing out that the piece of furniture which the OP mentions is pronounced differently from the name of a person who draws. – Mari-Lou A Oct 14 '17 at 12:17
  • Before stating that "drawer" IS the best possible term, try saying to yourself - as though in an introduction including your hobby - "I am a drawer". Then I think you'll see the problem. For one thing, simply saying that you're an "artist" is an uncomfortably pretentious declaration. Being termed "artist" is what others are to say ABOUT a person. The person doesn't usually say it of himself. And IN WHAT ART they participate? Bernstein, Picasso, Fellini, and Michael Jackson were ALL "artists". – Emily Canter Nov 16 '17 at 0:20
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The OP in a comment said

Before stating that "drawer" IS the best possible term, try saying to yourself - as though in an introduction including your hobby - "I am a drawer". Then I think you'll see the problem. For one thing, simply saying that you're an "artist" is an uncomfortably pretentious declaration. Being termed "artist" is what others are to say ABOUT a person. The person doesn't usually say it of himself. And IN WHAT ART they participate? Bernstein, Picasso, Fellini, and Michael Jackson were ALL "artists".

First, it's obvious, according to dictionaries, that drawer IS the right word. I agree it sounds strange to my ears, but that doesn't make it incorrect. For some reason it doesn't seem to be in common usage. So let's start using it, & correct this oversight.

Second, there's nothing pretentious about calling yourself an artist if you are one, any more than calling yourself a musician, an athlete, a writer, or a politician is pretentious. If you feel self-conscious about calling yourself an artist, either gain some self-esteem to be comfortable about who you are & what you do, or change careers/hobbies.

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    This is more of a comment and not an answer per se. Please see the tour - this isn't a forum site. – marcellothearcane Sep 12 at 7:08

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