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I am available on weekdays, except on Thursdays.

I am available on weekdays, except for Thursdays.

I have found two threads talking about it, but in both of them there were suggestions to change the sentences. Any help would be very much appreciated.

  • I would just say "I am available on all weekdays except Thursday." using "on" or "for" is not necessary – micsthepick Oct 10 '17 at 23:34
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I think for is more appropriate here because this usage fits the definition:

used as a function word to indicate an actual or implied enumeration or selection

In this case, you are selecting Thursday as the exception. If you want to use on, it might be better to rephrase your statement as "I am available on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays," which fits this definition:

used as a function word to indicate a time frame during which something takes place

The difference is slight and I doubt anyone but a pedant would fault you for using either one. As micsthepic mentioned, another option would be to omit the preposition entirely.

  • I’m pretty sure I know a lot of pedants who wouldn’t fault you for either. (...wouldn’t fault you on either? 😉) – G Tony Jacobs Oct 11 '17 at 1:25
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The first construction sounds wrong. I think @AffableAmbler has identified why, in terms of mixing enumerations and time frames.

It may work in a different form:

I am available during the week, except on Thursdays.

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