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I want to see whether I could use the auxiliary verb once, instead of twice as in:

one who speaks articulately, will be both appreciated and known as an "English expert."

or

one who speaks articulately, will both be appreciated and be known as an "English expert."

please help me and let me know which one is correct! thank you.

  • There is at least the possibility of zeugma in your example (appreciated as + known as), but 'John is both loved and hated by his fans' is fine. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 6 '17 at 21:11
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Yes, you can use a single auxiliary:

"I shall arise and go now;"

"But thy eternal summer shall not fade nor lose possession of that fair thou owest."

If Yeats and Shakespeare can do it, you can too.

However, I do not find either of your sentences to be flawless.

"One who speaks articulately will be both appreciated and known as an expert in English."

There is no need to separate the subject from the verb with a comma. And it is clearer to be explicit that the field of expertise is the English language without any possibility of implying that the expert is of English nationality.

"One who speaks articulately will both be appreciated and be known as an expert in English."

This addresses the same issues as in your first sentence, but gets "both ... and" parallel in the forms being paired.

  • Upvoted.' If Yeats and Shakespeare can do it, you can too.' – Nigel J Oct 7 '17 at 1:04
  • I'm not convinced that "if Yeats and Shakespeare can do it, you can too." (Quod licet Jovi non licet bovi.) But I upvoted for the rest of the answer. – Andreas Blass Oct 7 '17 at 1:36
  • I'd never quarrel with an up vote, and I agree that just following Shakespeare may not be prudent: he and his contemporaries enjoyed a baroque decoration of an English that is somewhat distant from today's. Yeats, however, had a very un-baroque style, however baroque or idiosyncratic his thoughts. If the two of them agree on a usage, then I feel that mere mortals may dare use it. – Jeff Morrow Oct 7 '17 at 2:28
  • I'm grateful. Thank you for your thorough explanation. – Pouya Oct 7 '17 at 3:01

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