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Does any verb exist that describes how someone can be warmed up by eating/drinking something warm and being bundled up in something such as a blanket that's just out of the dryer? I thought of how it would relate to hot compresses, but all I can find is that they're "wrapped" or "applied." I'm really trying to find a word that captures the meaning of being pleasantly encased in and filled with warmth, such as "enraptured." Unfortunately, that word isn't at all specific to heat. I'm not really sure how else to describe it except as a pleasant experience of warmth, maybe with a connotation of safety. If I were allowed to add morphisms at will, I'd call it "enwarmthen," but I know that word doesn't exist.

Ex: Janice was __________ by the warm blanket and peaceful fire after drinking a mug of hot chocolate.

  • 1
    Cuddled? I don't know of anything that includes a warm drink and a warm blanket simultaneously. – Xanne Oct 5 '17 at 2:57
  • 3
    If you can rephrase: Janice snuggled into the warm blanket and peaceful fire after drinking a mug of hot chocolate. – jxh Oct 5 '17 at 5:42
  • Warmed from within and without? – Xanne Oct 5 '17 at 9:39
  • Enveloped.... ...? – green_ideas Oct 5 '17 at 22:34
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Cocooned

cocooned in British (kəˈkuːnd) adjective 1. wrapped up; protected from cold or knocks She is comfortably cocooned in pillows. My snugly cocooned baby slept in his pram. 2. protected from unpleasant things She was cocooned in a private world of privilege.

  • While I like some of the other answers, I think this one is the best because it does deal with a sense of safety and also warmth. I also think it best describes wrapping yourself up tight in a blanket. It isn't /quite/ what I'd hoped for, since I was hoping a word existed that described active heat instead of protection from cold, but this works well. Thanks! :) – BrainFRZ Oct 7 '17 at 8:08
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Consider "swaddle":

Swaddle: wrap (someone, especially a baby) in garments or cloth. "she swaddled the baby tightly"

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I think the word cozy in its various permutations has the connotations you're looking for. Your question mentions being

warmed up by eating/drinking something warm and being bundled up in something such as a blanket

which sounds a lot like the noun version of cozy (all definitions from Oxford Dictionaries):

NOUN

  1. A soft covering to keep a teapot, boiled egg, etc., hot.

In this case, your warm blanket is acting like a "person cozy", keeping the hot chocolate the person drank and the person warm.

You also mention

being pleasantly encased in and filled with warmth . . . . a pleasant experience of warmth, maybe with a connotation of safety

Which sounds quite a bit like the adjective:

ADJECTIVE

  1. Giving a feeling of comfort, warmth, and relaxation.

Both warmth and comfort are included, and presumably enough safety that one can relax.

Finally, your blank suggests you want a verb, and cozy is used as a verb:

VERB [WITH OBJECT]
informal

  1. Give (someone) a feeling of comfort or complacency.
    1.1. (cozy up) [no object] Snuggle up to.

I think it would be fairly well understood in context:

Janice was cozied by the warm blanket and peaceful fire after drinking a mug of hot chocolate.

OR

Janice was cozied up in the warm blanket by the peaceful fire after drinking a mug of hot chocolate.

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http://www.thefreedictionary.com/enwombed

enwomb (ɪnˈwuːm) vb (tr; often passive) to enclose in or as if in a womb

On further research, the only time this word has ever been used seems to be in Scrabble.

In which it doesn't seem to be worth many points.

(A fact which ought to have warned me not to use it here.)

  • well this is a kind of scrabble but not everyone gets it – Edoardo Oct 5 '17 at 4:09
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    At -2 and dropping fast, I feel like I'm being scrabbled right now. – Nigel J Oct 5 '17 at 5:15
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No, such a word does not exist

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